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Airbrushing Q & A
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PostPosted: April 30th, 2011, 7:53 pm 
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Some useful accumulated knowledge from years past:

Airbrushing tips

This week I'm about to open my first model box in some time, so after a summer of DIY projects, I'm now back to my modelling; my biggest change is to using an airbrush. My painting always seem to let me down, I know I tend to coat to thick, and I should thin my paint more, but now I've switched to acrylics I'm hoping by airbrushing I'll get round my biggest problem, which is the paint work. My assembly skills are not bad, I don't mind fiddly bits, and I know I'm going to have to pay more detail to my pre finishing.

so what I am asking does anyone have any useful tips for a novice brusher, I'm using an aztek brush


MattBacon replied:
Practice a lot. Use a compressor. Set the pressure at no more than 15-20 psi. Stir the paint ridiculously well before thinning, then thin to milky consistency. Do several light coats, not one heavy one. Clean the airbrush religiously. Use good artists turpentine for thinning enamels (and bulk white spirit for cleaning). Buy some "Liquid reamer" or Badger airbrush cleaner to blast through straight after painting. Buy pipe cleaners if you have a suction tube to clean. Keep the airbrush moving all the time there's paint coming out of it.


Edgar replied:
Ignore any advice like "You must add xx% thinners to the paint." Paint consistency varies with temperature, and you're likely to need more thinners in winter than summer. Find the consistency (and only practice will do that) that matches your airbrush/air combination. I find that I need about 50% thinners, with Xtracolor, but I use a Paasche brush, which is much heavier than your Aztec. Paint the consistency of milk is the usual thing to look for. I realise that it sounds wasteful, but I always use a fresh tinlet of paint, for every colour. This gives me the opportunity to use the thinners to wash out the tin, and ensure that no lumps are left behind; that is a sure recipe for getting different shades, from the same tin.
When you're spraying, as well as never starting your pass(es) on the model, keep your forearm straight, and don't bend your wrist. Any tendency to "arc" your paintflow will give a heavier concentration, in the centre of the pass, than at the ends. When you practice (you'll be doing a lot of practice, first, won't you?) look at your spray pattern, and you'll see three, fairly distinct, areas; there'll be a heavy centre line, flanked by two lighter lines. Spray your next, heavy, line, into the previous lighter line, and so on, and you'll get completely even coverage.
Don't wear a woollen jumper, and use a proper facemask, with a cartridge, rather than a paper mask. If you wonder why, get into sunlight, and shake the jumper, and facemask; when you see the dust, that falls out, and imagine that little lot landing on your model........!

Pingu replied:
What the other have said. Plus, don't forget to clean your airbrush before use, as well as after ( from the cleaning point of view, think of it in the same way as you would as if it was your rifle, and you won't go far wrong).

Wear old clothes or, better, as few clothes as possible - you will spill paint out of the colour cup, no matter how hard you try, with monotinous regularity, and it's a lot easier to clean paint off skin than it is off cloth.

Practice, practice, practice.

A little flow enhancer goes a long way, Zero. Only add a couple of drops to the colour cup. Use Halfords economy de-icing fluid, or, in the case of Tamiya acrylics, their own-brand thinner, as basic thinners.

I get through less than one 75ml bottle of flow enhancer a year, and now use acrylics (mostly Citadel and Vallejo) for about 80% of my brush-painting.


Raspy replied:
Xtracrylix are superb for airbrushing but also seem to dry on the tip alot faster than Tamiya does so i use liquitex retarder with them in with the Xtracrylix thinners.As regards blowing through after use i have found Methylated spirits to be the best with Xtracrylix and isopropyl alcohol with tamiya.As pingu said cleanliness is probably the greatest thing with sucessful airbrushing because many people have found when their brush is coughing and spluttering 9 times out of ten its down to an unclean airbrush and not always incorrectly thinned paint.

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Airbrushing Q & A
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PostPosted: April 30th, 2011, 7:53 pm 
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Airbrush cleaning

I am about to start using Alclad II for the first time, but before I do I would like to be clear about which is the best product for cleaning my airbrush after use and any other general tips you might have.


Desmojen replied:
I use Alclad a lot, and have always used Revell airbrush cleaner to swill it out and the followed that up with Badger aerosol airbrush cleaner to good effect.


mikeew replied:
I use Alclad a lot too, I use badger aerosol spray airbrush cleaner and nothing else. This cleaner is cellulose based so cleans it out a treat, make sure you back flush to get all the metallic pigment out of the workings of your 'brush.

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PostPosted: April 30th, 2011, 7:54 pm 
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Help needed spraying camouflage schemes

I have recently been having problems spraying two or three colour camouflage patterns. Problem is I am using blu tack to set out the pattern and then masking the bits I dont want painted, but however careful I am the paint always ends up creeping under blue tack which means tons of touching up.

K5083 replied:
I would say that the trick is (1) make sure the paint doesn't go on the model too wet, i.e., back off on the amount of paint a bit if you are seeing a lot of liquid-like shine when it hits the surface, and more importantly, (2) make sure the spray angle hits the surface at right angles to the surface at all times. If the paint does not get a chance to flow when it is on the surface and if you do not spray at such an angle as to force it under the mask, you should be able to get a nice paint shadow of whatever masking material you are using. However this is easier said than done, the shape of the model itself may make it very difficult to get the airbrush in the proper position for the right spray angle.

Pingu replied:
Also, I'd start by spraying the underside colour. When this had dried, I'd mask off the edges with thin sausages of White-tac, as opposed to Blu-tac (less greasy, so doesn't leave marks on painted surfaces). fill in the areas not to be painted with Tamiya tape or Copydex latex glue. Ensure the White-tac sausages are well pressed down - you can always lift the edges slighlty if you want a feathered effect. Remember, however, that over-done feathering is one of the classic modelling mistakes. Go and look at real feathered camouflage and you'll see that in 1/48 or 1/72, this can be accurately representted by a nearly-hard-edged demarcation.

To avoid bleed-under, what August said about spraying at right angles, and not letting the paint go on too wet, is important. To a certain extent, this is a matter of trial and error, so get a few cheap kits to practice on (the Hobbyboss Easybuild kits are good for this), and you'll soon get the hang.

Once the second colour has gone on, dried and cured, mask this as described above, and spray the second colour. If there's a third colour, repeat the process. It's important to let colours dry at least overnight, even if you're using acrylics, so that they've cured enough to take masking. This really is an area where the motto 'less haste, more speed' applies.

Even so, expect to do a little touch-up, but this technique will minimise the need for it.

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Airbrushing Q & A
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PostPosted: April 30th, 2011, 7:55 pm 
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Which Air Brush?

I am about to jump back into modelling. My favourite areas of have been 1/72 and 1/48 aircraft of various types and flavours. As a young lad I always used brushes but would like to take the step up to purchasing an air brush and compressor. As a ham fisted amateur I was wondering whether someone could recommend a good beginners air brush?


Malepo replied:
I'd go for a dual action and a compressor - those are sold in combi (at least here in Europe/Ger) for about 100€ +/- 20 and mostly a good start. Look for a quiet comp and a brush with a nozzle diameter of 0.3 or 0.5mm, cause those are easier to handle than 0.2 nozzles.


Flakmonkey replied:
Make sure you can get spares for whatever airbrush you buy before parting with any cash. Some of the ebay specials for instance are virtually impossible to find nozzles or needles for and these do wear out and get damaged. On the other hand, if you go for a branded airbrush from a well known manufacturer you are pretty much guaranteed to find everything you need should anything break. Some people will recommend an Aztek, I always found them fussy, uncomfortable to use and plasticky but each to his own. My choice would be Iwata's entry level Revolution CR. All Iwatas are very well made, and the Revolution is no exception. They're also extremely comfortable to use, have a decent sized colour cup, are easy to clean and can be upgraded with a finer nozzle and needle, inline moisture trap, and different handles including a couple of preset ones if you feel the need. You should be able to get one for between £60 - £80 which for the level of performance on offer is a genuine bargain.

Mattbacon replied:
I’ve got to second that... an airbrush is not essential (there are plenty of practitioners of the “hairy stick” here who get outstanding results), but if you are going to get one at all , spend the money to get a good one, not a bargain basement job. You’ll get nowhere, and learn nothing useful with a “spray gun”, and any money you’ve spent on it will just be wasted. Airbrushes are a lot cheaper in real terms now than they used to be, and you should look for an entry-level double-action brush from a reputable maker. Personally, I think Iwata’s are pretty much the best there is, though many others swear by Harder and Steenbeck.

The best guy I know to talk to is Paul, at little-cars.com. He’s very knowledgeable, and is often at shows with “package deals" of airbrushes and compressors to suit all experience levels and pockets.

His airbrush catalogue is here:

http://www.little-cars.co.uk/airbrushes_v5.2.doc

...and you can call him on: (+44) 01234 711980

He always seems to answer the phone and to be happy to talk and give advice.

I think you should expect to spend around £180-200 for a reasonable airbrush and compressor. You can get spend less, but you’ll probably be spending it again in a year or so when something’s broken or not performing properly, whereas a reasonable quality airbrush and compressor should last you a decade with the occasional spare part.

Dknights replied:
Whatever brush you get, the real key is practice, practice, practice. Take old kits and practice painting and repainting. Vary paint mixes and pressure. When you get frustrated, and you will, don't quit. Been using an airbrush for 25 years and I learn something new each time I use it.

Jagewa replied:
I'd also look at the pricing of the Tamiya Spray-Work airbrushes. I read they were made by Iwata, and are a lot cheaper...

I bought a Spray-Work Super Fine http://www.hlj.com/product/TAM74514, and it is a lovely airbrush. http://www.tamiya.com/english/products/ ... r_fine.htm

I think the Tamiya Spray-Work HG is comparable to the Revolution CR, the CR is 0.5mm nozzle and the Tamiya is 0.3mm.

But yes practise is the key.

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Airbrushing Q & A
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PostPosted: April 30th, 2011, 7:56 pm 
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'How to' thorough clean of airbrush

After a spraying session a couple of nights ago I thought i'd do a quick film of how I do a thorough end of session brush cleanout, hope its of use to someone.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9YnScCetDo


Bassman replied:
My procedure is a little bit different in that the final cleaning is in an ultrasonic cleaner with a special (mild) cleaning fluid. This removes all paint inside the airbrush and from the parts.

Derek H replied:
Very interesting video, at one point you mention spraying through with Ammonia solution, I was told this would be harmful to the airbrush.

Andrew R replied:
Yes, ammonia is corrosive to brass components. So if you do clean the airbrush with Windex or another ammonia based solution, be sure to flush it out thoroughly with water afterwards.

M1ks replied:
Yes, I mentioned an ammonia solution for cleaning after using Acrylic paints, I did this once or twice but don't bother now as it's far easier to just use IPA, regardless of the cleaning medium I always blow through thoroughly with water to complete, to flush through and check that re-assembly has been performed correctly and spray pattern is OK.
As AndrewR says, just flush through thorougly afterwards with water if you do use ammonia solutions or a proprietary cleaner like windex, (as yet I cannot find a window cleaner in the UK which contains ammonia anymore, it's all vinegar)

Bassman replied:Tickopur R33 Universeel cleaner is the cleaning fluid I use in my ultrasonic cleaner. You have to flush all parts of your airbrush with water after cleaning. It really works well. You will be surprised how much paint still comes out of your airbrush.
There is also a more agressive variant of the fluid with ammonia but I don't use this version. The fluid is sold by an Airbrush supplies company here so it is safe to use it.
http://www.airbrush-services-almere.nl/ ... /d117.html
The ultrasonic cleaner will be useful for your small motorbike parts too.

The paints I spray are mostly Tamiya and Revell acrylics and sometimes Humbrol and Revell enemals.

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Airbrushing Q & A
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PostPosted: April 30th, 2011, 7:57 pm 
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Airbrush advice

This newbie needs to know if I buys an airbrush do i need a compressor or are the propellant cans ok?

Bluesteel replied:
Propellant cans work perfectly satisfactorily but, if you are going do use your airbrush regularly they work out very expensive. It works out cheaper in the medium and long run to invest in a good compressor if you can stretch to it.

Peebeep replied:
Airbrush + compressor = no brainer

James Perrin replied:
If you're a newbie I wouldn't rush into buying an airbrush and compressor. They are a substantial investment as they are a precision tool and your wasting money buying anything cheap. They take some time to master so don't go getting one just because you think it will instantly making your a better modeller, practice is the only thing that will do that.

Johnsan replied:
Gotta agree with James on holding off on an airbrush. That is unless you already possess airbrushing skills.

It's generally a much better idea to acquire basic modeling skills.


MerlinJones replied:
All of which I said, without moving my li...fingers!

I've used an airbrush only twice, before I decided it was more trouble than it's worth.
I then studied the great masters (Hall and Phillpott) and sussed out modelling BA*.
I've ever since been an advocate of the Hairy Stick and, when I've mastered that, I might go back to the airbrush, although I won't need to, 'cos I'd be a Master of le Baton Hirsute and fully capable of natural metal finishes, mottling, soft-demarkation and exhaust staining, using a brush.

Peebeep replied:
I'll be the square peg in the round hole here. Basic airbrushing is not a particularly difficult skill to master IMO. Fine line work and other more advanced techniques take practice, I wouldn't argue that. When doing white, reds, yellows, silver etc, given the choice between bristles and airbrush I'll be picking the airbrush. Also if you're starting out and are not to sure about how you might progress there's plenty of budget starter kits out there that don't cost an arm and a leg.


Brews replied:
Ditto. I started "airbrushing" at 13 years of age with a Badger 250. Wide spray, lots of masking, and used a car tyre for air pressure, rolling it down to the local service station for a fill-up now and then. But the 250 is easy to clean.

I kept that setup until I was 27! That's when I got a Badger 200 knock-off and a desktop compressor, and my airbrushing improved a lot.

Jagewa replied:
Exactly the same here, lugging the spare trailer wheel down to the garage for a fill up.. hehe fun times.

I got so much a better finish, with an airbrush. I've also noticed with the kids as well and Acrylic paints, can spray and get a lovely finish, its just the underlying plastic preparation that is the trick. Isn't there a painters adage about preparation...

Tecdes replied:
I am on my second & third models.

So everything is new & skills are learnt from one day to the next.

As I have found I am not going to be a skilled model maker over night but already I can see improvement.

I bought an air brush for the first model. Some parts went right some not so good but that was because I was on a learning curve not only on airbrushing but on masking & a host of other things all inter connected.

My opinion is start into air brushing now if you are going to at some time. Better to have the difficulties on your early models. To gain good model experience & start producing the goods then to go into air brushing & find you have slipped back is going to be highly frustrating.

Yes frustration all the way around but my air brushing has improved. A long way to go but starting early & the air brushing technique will keep pace with all the other model techniques.

Also buy an airbrush with a double action. I first bought a single action & found it frustrating. With the double action I made a great improvements compared to the single action.

Probably get knocked down here but this is the experience of a novice & you cannot get closer to it than that.

Mattbacon replied:
My single biggest piece of advice, learned after a long while, is that it's a BRUSH, not a SPRAY GUN. Use it like a hairy stick that gives you much more control and a far smoother texture, and you'll be away. Personally, I'd go straight to a double action (press down for air, pull back for paint) - you'll only end up buying one before too long. You can get them with a paint flow control in the handle as well, which means that to start with you can "set" the paint flow like a single action (press to paint), and not worry about over-egging it with the trigger. Wind the control back to fully open, though, and you can drive it all with the trigger.

Also, be aware that whatever people say about "brushing at 20 psi", there are no hard and fast rules... you have to practice with your brush and your compressor. My Iwata blows ten times as much air through it at 20 psi as my Badger - what's a gale in the Iwata is a breeze in the Badger.

Peebeep replied:
'got by' with lash up equipment (el cheapo double action airbrush and a compressor ripped out from a fridge we were throwing away), but finally decided to bite the bullet a couple of years ago. I got an Iwata Eclipse from a local art supplier at a reasonable price - £115; a Chinese compressor with reservoir from Simple2Trade - £90 inc. shipping. Various sundries - braided air line, adapter set for the compressor and cleaning pot/stand all for about £50. It has transformed the way I'm able to do things and was worth every penny.

If you shop around you can get entry level double action brushes for well under a ton and a reasonable compressor for £50-£60. I'd recommend getting a compressor with a reservoir, once you've used one you won't want anything else. Realistically you could set up for about £150 if you shop around, but I wouldn't rule out an ebay starter set with clone brushes, pretty much a compressor with free airbrush or brushes that might be considered disposable.

As Matt says it's worth having a chat with Paul @ Little Cars, especially if you're thinking more along the lines of top quality branded stuff.

Flakmonkey replied:
The Chinese compressors that peebeep mentioned are good value and surprisingly well made if a little on the noisy side at times. A reservoir is essential to stop "pulsing" of the airflow.

The Iwata Revolution CR is an excellent entry level airbrush that you can upgrade with one of two preset handles (which give you the paint flow control that Matt mentioned) when funds allow. I've used a Revolution for about three years now and don't feel any need to upgrade to a more expensive airbrush. Whatever you get make sure that replacement parts are easily available.

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Airbrushing Q & A
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PostPosted: January 20th, 2013, 6:01 pm 
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Never even held an airbrush, but thinking of taking the plunge.

Can anybody recommend a good starter kit please?

Type, make, model and so on.

Thanks

Phil


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2013, 7:35 pm 
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I've used a Paasche H since I started using an airbrush. They are available as starter sets. It is a simple single-action airbrush, easy to use, easy to clean and inexpensive, but something that, with care, will last you a lifetime. I personally have no intention of moving up to something more complicated.

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PostPosted: January 20th, 2013, 7:52 pm 
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Thanks Paul


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2013, 12:42 am 
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I got the Iwata Intro Starter kit for my last birthday. Everything needed is in the box, and I'm very happy with it. It's an Eclipse BCS Double Action airbrush. I'd never used an airbrush before.

Cheers

Andrew

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Airbrushing Q & A
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PostPosted: January 21st, 2013, 2:00 pm 
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I'm due a decent amount of commission this month so I was considering splashing out on this:

https://airbrushes.com/product_info.php ... f880121ff9

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PostPosted: January 21st, 2013, 6:05 pm 
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Understand that I am not a fine-line, detail, painter -- I use an airbrush to get a nice coat or two of paint on a model, sometimes with a camo pattern.

That said, I recommend you not get the cheapest, but something of decent quality, mid-range. My first & 2nd airbrushes (Badger) gave me a lot of problems and I became very frustrated with airbrushing. I moved up to an Iwata Eclipse double-action and am perfectly happy (and still on my first one). Paints well, cleans well, behaves well. Yes, it is double action, but 90% of the time, I just push it all the way down and haul it all the way back and it's single-action .... I tend to adjust air pressure at the tank and paint by thinning. I'm not clever enough to do much more.

In short, buy good and your experience will be happier.

Echo the thought about spare parts. I have no place anywhere near to buy parts, so I ordered most if the innards, just in case -- not that they break but that I drop something and lose it ....

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PostPosted: January 22nd, 2013, 1:35 am 
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Brickie wrote:
I'm due a decent amount of commission this month so I was considering splashing out on this:

https://airbrushes.com/product_info.php ... f880121ff9


I have had the same setup and found the brush is much better than you would expect for the price.

On the other hand I found the compressor a bit under powered as its the on all the time no tank type. OK for very thin paint but struggles to spray the thicker paint.

Once I had learnt the basics of airbrushing I went for a Harder & Steenbeck airbrush not cheep but the are the Rolls Royce of airbrushes and a much bigger compressor.

Have you looked at the little-cars.co.uk I found they give excellent advice if you give them a call and their service is second to none. they used to sell the same setup.

Regards Splash

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PostPosted: January 22nd, 2013, 5:06 am 
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It's worth investing in the little ultrasonic cleaning bath too. It makes cleaning very quick and easy. I just give my airbrush a 3 minute wash in distilled water and washing up liquid and it cleans up very nicely. Admittedly I only spray Vallejo acrylics, but it makes clean up after painting so easy!

I got an even cheaper one than the one advertised on your link - it's meant for cleaning specs and jewelry. The airbrush needle just fits in.

Cheers

Andrew

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PostPosted: February 21st, 2013, 12:05 am 
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Another convert to Harder and Steenbeck here. Works all the time - every time. It's a joy to use and easy to clean.

I also bought mine from Little-Cars. com. It cost me £90 (which was excellent value considering the quality. Although I spent a bit more on an airline adaptor and some extra bits and pieces.


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